5 Secrets to Foot and Ankle Tendinitis

One of the most common foot and ankle injuries is tendinitis (also called tendonitis or tendinopathy). Tendinitis occurs when the tissue that connects muscles to bone becomes inflamed. This can be caused by excessive exercise, a sudden increase in activity level, or poor arch support of your shoes—or any combination of these things! Other causes include: running on hard surfaces …

Rigid Flatfoot and Coalition

What Is a Tarsal Coalition?    A tarsal coalition is an abnormal connection that develops between two bones in the back of the foot (the tarsal bones). This abnormal connection, which can be composed of bone, cartilage or fibrous tissue, may lead to limited motion and pain in one or both feet. The tarsal bones include the calcaneus (heel bone), …

Os Trigonum Syndrome

What Is the Os Trigonum?   The os trigonum is an extra (accessory) bone that sometimes develops behind the ankle bone (talus). It is connected to the talus by a fibrous band. The presence of an os trigonum in one or both feet is congenital (present at birth). It becomes evident during adolescence when one area of the talus does …

Haglund’s (Heel Bump) Disease

What Is Haglund’s Deformity?   Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft tissue near the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful bursitis, which is an inflammation of the bursa (a fluid-filled sac between the tendon and bone). Causes Haglund’s deformity is often called …

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

What Is PTTD?    The posterior tibial tendon serves as one of the major supporting structures of the foot, helping it to function while walking. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a condition caused by changes in the tendon, impairing its ability to support the arch. This results in flattening of the foot. PTTD is often called adult acquired flatfoot …

Charcot Foot

What Is Charcot Foot?   Charcot Neuroarthropathy foot is a condition causing weakening of the bones in the foot that can occur in people who have significant nerve damage (neuropathy). The bones are weakened enough to fracture, and with continued walking, the foot eventually changes shape. As the disorder progresses, the joints collapse and the foot takes on an abnormal …

Heel Fracture

What Is the Calcaneus?   The calcaneus, also called the heel bone, is a large bone that forms the foundation of the rear part of the foot. The calcaneus connects with the talus and cuboid bones. The connection between the talus and calcaneus forms the subtalar joint. This joint is important for normal foot function. The calcaneus is often compared …

Calcaneal Apophysitis (Sever’s Disease)

What Is Calcaneal Apophysitis?   Calcaneal apophysitis is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 years old, because the heel bone (calcaneus) is not fully developed until at least age 14. Until then, new bone is forming at the growth plate (physis), a weak area located at the …

Ankle Fractures

What Is an Ankle Fracture?    A fracture is a partial or complete break in a bone. Fractures in the ankle can range from the less serious avulsion injuries (small pieces of bone that have been pulled off) to severe shattering-type breaks of the tibia, fibula or both. Ankle fractures are common injuries most often caused by the ankle rolling …